Stool Donation

Are You a Prospective Poop Donor?

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“Potential stool donors currently must fill out a questionnaire similar to that of blood donors, and undergo blood and stool tests prior to their donation to "make sure you aren't giving anyone stool that could harm them," McSweeney said.

For example, the first U.S. stool bank, OpenBiome, requires that donors fill out a 200-point clinical questionnaire and take more than two dozen blood and stool screens.

Dr. Colleen Kelley is an assistant professor of gastroenterology with the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, in Providence. "There is a very high bar to be a stool donor," she said. "OpenBiome rejects 97 percent of the donors who apply."

Read more: https://health.usnews.com/health-care/articles/2018-06-05/are-you-a-prospective-poop-donor

Here's Why People Are Donating Their Poop to Science

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“At 40 bucks a poop, fecal donors can cash in on their flushings – and improve others' health.

"It's harder to be a stool donor at OpenBiome than it is to be accepted into Harvard or MIT – that's the level of rigor it takes," says Dr. Majdi Osman, an internal medicine physician and the nonprofit's clinical program director. That's because most of the chosen stool will eventually end up in someone else's colon; if it's not carefully screened, the recipient could wind up with any number of medical conditions with potential links to the microbiome.”

Read more: https://health.usnews.com/health-care/patient-advice/articles/2018-05-10/heres-why-people-are-donating-their-poop-to-science