New York Times

Do You Have the Right Stuff to Be a Stool Donor?

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“To do something as simple as going in and making a stool donation, and know that it can literally change someone’s life from one day to the next when they have a disease like C. diff, where they can’t even leave their house and the next day they can go about things fairly normally — to see that impact makes me feel good,” he said.”

 

Read more:

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/05/well/live/fecal-transplant-stool-donor.html

Fecal Transplants Made (Somewhat) More Palatable

"Dr. Jessica R. Allegretti, a physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, is putting together trials of the capsules against Crohn’s disease, obesity and primary C. difficile.

“It really does reduce the time from evaluation to procedure. It really does broaden who can get treated on a much larger scale, and for that, capsules are the wave of the future,” she said — especially, she added, for disorders that appear to require multiple treatments, or “maintenance” doses."

(Headlined "Waste As Its Own Solution" in the print edition.)

Should We Bank Our Own Stool?

"Why, I wondered, didn’t doctors work harder to prevent this collateral damage, not with store-bought probiotics, but with “microbial restoration”? Why didn’t we re-infuse patients with their own microbes after antibiotics?"

 

Find out about how to participate in OpenBiome's pilot launch of PersonalBiome here

A New Kind of Transplant Bank

"Around noon on a recent Friday, Donor Five, a healthy 31-year-old, walked across M.I.T.’s frigid, wind-swept campus to a third-floor restroom to make a contribution to public health.

Less than two hours later, a technician blended the donor’s stool into preparations that looked like chocolate milk. The material was separated and stored in freezers at an M.I.T. microbiology lab, awaiting shipment to hospitals around the country. Each container was carefully labeled: Fecal Microbiota Preparation."

Read the full piece here