Multimedia

The Power of Poop: Fecal Transplants

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“If the idea of fecal transplants seems momentarily disquieting, consider that they achieve a 90 percent cure rate for the devastating intestinal infection known as C. diff when antibiotics fail to clear it. Fecal transplants are also being studied as treatment for colitis, Crohn’s disease, and other inflammatory gastrointestinal disorders, and research into their value for urinary tract infections and even Parkinson’s disease is underway. By transferring stool in sterile conditions from a donor to the intestines of someone who is ailing, fecal transplants are designed to introduce a healthy mix of gut bacteria into the body and restore bacterial balance. What’s that good for?”

Watch the panel discussion here.

Human Feces Can Cure Some Infections. Is The FDA About To Restrict It? (Audio)

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“The Boston area is the epicenter of a debate dividing the medical community.

The argument? How human feces should be regulated.

That's right — fecal transplanting is the process of transferring poop from a healthy donor to a sick patient. And it's proven effective for treating certain infections.

But some doctors and patient advocates are concerned that the Food and Drug Administration is about to clamp down on this radical therapy.”

listen more to the full segment here: https://www.wbur.org/radioboston/2019/04/12/human-feces-fda-restrict

Fecal matter pills used to treat peanut allergies in Boston study (VIDEO)

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“There's evidence that when someone has a food allergy, gut bacteria send the wrong message about what the body should tolerate. 

‘We looked at babies who were allergic and babies who were not allergic and we analyzed their microbiota and we found significant differences between the babies that were allergic and the babies that were not allergic,’ said Dr. Rachid.

The thought is by transplanting another person's healthy gut bacteria into someone with an allergy, the microbiome can be repaired and send healthy signals to the immune system to tolerate allergens like peanuts.” 

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People V. Cancer: The Microbiome Connection (VIDEO)

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“How does the gut microbiome help with patients’ receptivity to immunotherapy? What key factors influence it and what strategies offer the opportunity to shape it and augment therapeutic response?”

Watch the video below:

A User's Guide to Cheating Death: Germs (VIDEO)

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“Are we too clean? Germ theory and hand washing saved millions of lives, but has the pendulum swung too far in the opposite direction? We talk about everything from regular soap versus anti-bacterial, our microbiome and the role of probiotics, the hygiene hypothesis and the rise of auto-immune diseases, and explore both fecal transplants and helminthic therapy.”

Watch the episode here!

(Requires subscription)

What's Living In You? (VIDEO)

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“Whether they make you fat, fart, or freak out, microbes play a central role in your life. Right beneath your nose—on your face, in your gut, and everywhere in between—trillions of bacteria, viruses, and fungi are so abundant in your body, they outnumber your human cells. But these aren’t just nasty hitch-hikers. Many are crucial to your survival.”

Watch the full episode here.

When Poop Becomes Medicine (VIDEO)

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"Fecal transplants—where doctors try to cure sick people of various ills by giving them the stools of healthy donors—have been used since at least fourth-century China, according to texts that make reference to 'yellow soup.' The unusual treatment has been rediscovered many times since, but it’s finally starting to enter the medical mainstream. Partly, that’s because of a surge of interest in the microbiome—the trillions of microbes that share our bodies. Partly, it’s because many well-conducted studies have shown that fecal transplants are incredibly effective at treating Clostridium difficile—a nasty, hardy bacterium that causes severe, recurring, and potentially fatal bouts of diarrhea."

See the video here.

So You Want To Be A Sh*t Donor? (AUDIO)

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"OpenBiome is changing lives thanks to the increasing evidence of the crucial impact of gut health and the microbiome on our overall health – with potential applications in a range of areas, from Parkinson’s to mental health. The company is pioneering research in this field, currently supporting 14 clinical trials.

We wanted to get to the bottom of this fascinating new medicine, so we caught up with founder Mark Smith to get down and dirty on stool banks, fecal transplants, and how this research is revolutionising medicine."

Verify: The healing power of poop (VIDEO)

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"So, are we so obsessed with being clean that we're making ourselves sick? The science says yes:

  • Germs and bacteria are misunderstood.

  • Some bacteria are bad, but most help us maintain a healthy balance in the microbiome.

  • In our quest to kill germs, we have traded infectious diseases for chronic ones that are very hard to treat. And that’s why we’re turning to therapies like the fecal transplant.

The concept behind the poop transplant is very basic. A donor, who’s been through a rigorous screening process, provides a stool sample that’s loaded with his or her naturally healthy bacteria. It's then implanted into the patient who has a bacterial disease.

So far, doctors have done almost 30,000 fecal transplants for C. difficile. But now there are promising trials underway to treat obesityulcerative colitis and even autism."

Vice News (VIDEO)

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"Fecal transplants have the power to revolutionize medicine, but hospitals need raw materials. At Open Biome, the country’s first independent stool bank right outside Boston, donors earn $40 for each sample.  The clinic, however, approves less than 3 percent of applicants. VICE correspondent Thomas Morton visited the stool bank and made a deposit."

Click here to watch the video.

TEDMED (VIDEO)

With the rise of antibiotic resistance, the search is on for therapies that can combat bacterial infections without engaging in an evolutionary arms race.

OpenBiome is a nonprofit stool bank that aims to expand safe access to fecal transplantation for patients with recurrent C. difficile and to catalyze research on the microbiome’s role in human health. OpenBiome provides clinicians with rigorously screened, ready-to-use stool preparations and supports researchers with a suite of tools to discover how gut bacteria might treat diseases beyond C. difficile.

Since 2013, OpenBiome has partnered with over 700 healthcare institutions across all 50 states and 6 countries to deliver over 14,000 treatments for recurrent C. difficile. Its portfolio includes 50% of all U.S. trials exploring the use of fecal transplants in new diseases. Watch the TED Talk here.

VICE on HBO (VIDEO)

For years, medical science was powerless against one of the most of severe intestinal infections. But a new treatment shows tremendous promise -- if patients aren't too squeamish to try it.

Fecal transplants use the stool from a healthy person to repopulate life-sustaining bacteria in the colon of the patient. This technique is so effective that researchers are testing its potential to treat disorders far beyond the digestive tract, pointing to breakthrough treatments for a broad range of the most stubborn diseases.

VICE reports from the labs and lavatories where this medical revolution is taking place. Watch the full video or the debrief.

One Man's Poop is Another's Medicine [VIDEO]

Click to view on CNN.com

Click to view on CNN.com

In this video, CNN Health correspondent Elizabeth Cohen spends a morning with Eric, an OpenBiome donor, to capture the experience of what it takes to donate stool for medicine, and how his stool gets processed into treatments (featuring Lab Technician Christina Kim).  

OpenBiome featured on BBCTwo programme Trust Me, I'm a Doctor

"Surgeon Gabriel Weston travelled to Rhode Island in the US to watch Dr Colleen Kelly perform a faecal transplant — a procedure that has a 90% success rate when used to treat the life-threatening bacterial infection Clostridium difficile.

It is vital that the poo being used in the transplant is properly screened for infections and disease and it’s actually much harder to be a poo donor than you might think. At Open Biome in Boston, a non-profit company that provides screened, filtered and frozen poo for clinical use, only 6% of potential donors make it through the rigorous testing programme." 

To read more, click HERE.   UK audiences may watch the clip HERE.