2016

TEDMED (VIDEO)

With the rise of antibiotic resistance, the search is on for therapies that can combat bacterial infections without engaging in an evolutionary arms race.

OpenBiome is a nonprofit stool bank that aims to expand safe access to fecal transplantation for patients with recurrent C. difficile and to catalyze research on the microbiome’s role in human health. OpenBiome provides clinicians with rigorously screened, ready-to-use stool preparations and supports researchers with a suite of tools to discover how gut bacteria might treat diseases beyond C. difficile.

Since 2013, OpenBiome has partnered with over 700 healthcare institutions across all 50 states and 6 countries to deliver over 14,000 treatments for recurrent C. difficile. Its portfolio includes 50% of all U.S. trials exploring the use of fecal transplants in new diseases. Watch the TED Talk here.

VICE on HBO (VIDEO)

For years, medical science was powerless against one of the most of severe intestinal infections. But a new treatment shows tremendous promise -- if patients aren't too squeamish to try it.

Fecal transplants use the stool from a healthy person to repopulate life-sustaining bacteria in the colon of the patient. This technique is so effective that researchers are testing its potential to treat disorders far beyond the digestive tract, pointing to breakthrough treatments for a broad range of the most stubborn diseases.

VICE reports from the labs and lavatories where this medical revolution is taking place. Watch the full video or the debrief.

Banking on stool despite an uncertain future

Science.png

Tina Amirtha from Science discusses the regulatory future of fecal transplants, and how universal stool banks like OpenBiome could continue to make an impact. Here's an excerpt from the article:

"Whatever the commercial future of FMTs, the stool banks say they’ll have other work to do. OpenBiome may focus more on research, Edelstein says. Besides stool, OpenBiome provides guidance on experimental designs, safety protocols, and IND applications. The Leiden bank seeks to advance science as well. It just started a research collaboration with Vedanta Biosciences, and it plans to study whether fecal transplants should be given to C. difficile patients at an earlier stage. “Now, patients receive [an] FMT when they have tried all the other options,” Kuijper says. “But more can easily benefit.” 

Click here for the full article.