Experts call for new approach to regulating fecal transplants

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"A paper today in Science calls for a better way to regulate an increasingly popular method of treating recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI).

The method, known as fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), involves the transfer of stool from a healthy donor—via colonoscopy, nasogastric tube, or enema—into the colon of a patient who has recurrent CDI to re-introduce healthy bacteria into the gut. While still an investigational treatment, FMT has produced strong results in several small clinical trials in recent years, with cure rates as high as 90%.

A growing number of physicians are turning to it as an alternative to antibiotics—which can contribute to re-infection by wiping out the beneficial gut bacteria that keep C difficile bacteria in check—and several medical societies have said it should be a standard of care for patients with multiply recurrent CDI.

But proponents of FMT are concerned that the unsettled regulatory landscape may be preventing the procedure from being more widely accessible."